Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

General discussions about getting and staying fit that don't relate directly to your indoor rower
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JoeChaos
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Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by JoeChaos » April 23rd, 2021, 5:21 pm

I had a non-displaced, radius head fracture the week before I got my rowerg purchase link. I received our rowerg this week and since I was 4 weeks from the break i gave it a very gentle damper setting 1 go. The area of the break seems to be recovered with full movement but soft tissue isn't right. Twisting movements cause a bit of pain. It's mostly wrist and middle of the top of my forearm. I stopped rowing immediately.

Since then my arm has got a lot better through this week. I'm tempted to try again.

Does anyone have experience of similar injury and the recovery? What about recovery time before rowing? How to recover with rowing? These are the sorts of questions I have, if anyone has any answers or advice is gratefully receive them.

I know I'm being impatient but I'm very motivated to get fit again through use of the rowerg. I just don't want to lose or waste that motivation. I need to get fit as my activity levels have dropped a lot from even last year as I struggle to fit in exercise outside the house these days.

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Citroen
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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by Citroen » April 23rd, 2021, 5:25 pm

You should talk to your orthopaedic surgeon rather than asking for random advice from random folks on an internet forum.

JoeChaos
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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by JoeChaos » April 23rd, 2021, 5:45 pm

Yes but they only ever give vague advice to cover themselves. Basically no idea of whatever sport or fitness activity so only give basic advice on day to day living. You have to really push to even get advice on when you can drive again? My conversation on that said at least 2 weeks but only drive when you can hold the wheel and move the gear stick without pain. Nothing on typical recovery times or how to get back into exercise and in my case back cycling.

Sometimes medical professionals are more bothered about sticking to the protocols or script if you like than give you advice on such matters. Discussing such matters on a forum for the activity concerned doesn't mean I'll blindly follow advice but it's often a good way to get shared experiences. It's not an uncommon injury so it's reasonable to expect someone on here had been where I am and can give their experiences even advice. You can learn from others.

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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by Ripples » April 23rd, 2021, 11:07 pm

On Thanksgiving Day 2015 I had a nondisplaced two-part fracture of the surgical head of my left humerus. My concern at that time was if it would affect paddling my sea kayak (I didn't get my Concept2 D until January 2017). Three weeks after the fracture there was good callus development and bone growth, so my ortho ordered PT. In addition to my sessions at the PT center, I doubled up on the PT "homework" and did them twice a day. Three months after the fracture I was back in my kayak. No problems with the shoulder but it was obvious the soft tissue and ligaments had not completely healed. I continued doing PT at home which helped enormously and I had no issues as the summer progressed. I still do the exercises about once a week because paddling is quite shoulder intensive. I will admit it took a full year before I could comfortably sleep on my left side.

Did your doctor order physical therapy? If not, you should request it. If so, do the PT at home as well as during your onsite sessions. Best wishes for complete healing.

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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by JoeChaos » April 24th, 2021, 3:27 pm

I was wondering whether I should keep to a low drag factor. I was on a damper setting of 1 then after a minute moved to 3. The log gave a drag factor of 104. I believe 100-130 is the optimum. Am I right in thinking that it's easier way 100 than 130? If so then recovery is better at 100.

What's your views?

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Ombrax
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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by Ombrax » April 24th, 2021, 8:45 pm

JoeChaos wrote:
April 24th, 2021, 3:27 pm
Am I right in thinking that it's easier way 100 than 130? If so then recovery is better at 100.
Correct.

As long as you aren't trying for a given pace (which in your condition you shouldn't be doing, unless it's super-slow) it should feel easier to pull at DF = 100 than 130 and the forces on your arm should be lower.

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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by JoeChaos » April 25th, 2021, 4:22 am

Thanks.

I'm starting off and recovering from a broken arm so I was planning on taking things easier than I would normally do. I'm a kind of push it hard exerciser with things like rowers. Years ago when i developed leg pain with the gym c2 rowers I switched to steppers and did a set number of floors as fast as I could then did the same number again trying to beat the first time. Then next session I had to beat the total time again. Used to leave the stepper feeling nauseous through the effort and more than just a little unsteady. It got me fit for hiking certainly.

Now I figure if I'm not going to to go backwards in recovery I've got to basically do n it so I'm not really getting much benefit. More n so I'm moving and not getting worse in terms of fitness. Then build up slowly over a few weeks. Stepping back if there's pain issues even taking a break. I'll leave it on damper 3 and DF of 100 for some time.

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hjs
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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by hjs » April 25th, 2021, 5:12 am

JoeChaos wrote:
April 25th, 2021, 4:22 am
Thanks.

I'm starting off and recovering from a broken arm so I was planning on taking things easier than I would normally do. I'm a kind of push it hard exerciser with things like rowers. Years ago when i developed leg pain with the gym c2 rowers I switched to steppers and did a set number of floors as fast as I could then did the same number again trying to beat the first time. Then next session I had to beat the total time again. Used to leave the stepper feeling nauseous through the effort and more than just a little unsteady. It got me fit for hiking certainly.

Now I figure if I'm not going to to go backwards in recovery I've got to basically do n it so I'm not really getting much benefit. More n so I'm moving and not getting worse in terms of fitness. Then build up slowly over a few weeks. Stepping back if there's pain issues even taking a break. I'll leave it on damper 3 and DF of 100 for some time.
This can’t wirk, once fit you have to be very smart to get better, look at an olympic athlete, they often improve maybe 1% over a full 4 year cycle and not seldom improve not at all. Trying to beat every training every time will always end in a disaster.

Dangerscouse
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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by Dangerscouse » April 25th, 2021, 12:35 pm

hjs wrote:
April 25th, 2021, 5:12 am
This can’t wirk, once fit you have to be very smart to get better, look at an olympic athlete, they often improve maybe 1% over a full 4 year cycle and not seldom improve not at all. Trying to beat every training every time will always end in a disaster.
Yep, totally agree. You have got to really clever and considered with how you go about trying to improve, otherwise you're just chasing ever decreasing results and make yourself more susceptible to injury and illness.
47 HWT; 6' 4"; 1k= 3:09; 2k= 6:36; 5k= 17:24; 6k= 20:47; 10k= 35:46 30mins= 8,428m 60mins= 16,618m HM= 1:16.47; FM= 2:40:41; 50k= 3:16:09; 100k= 7:52:44; 12hrs = 153km

"You reap what you row"

Instagram: stuwenman

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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by mict450 » April 25th, 2021, 2:10 pm

JoeChaos wrote:
April 25th, 2021, 4:22 am
Thanks.

I'm starting off and recovering from a broken arm so I was planning on taking things easier than I would normally do. I'm a kind of push it hard exerciser with things like rowers. Years ago when i developed leg pain with the gym c2 rowers I switched to steppers and did a set number of floors as fast as I could then did the same number again trying to beat the first time. Then next session I had to beat the total time again. Used to leave the stepper feeling nauseous through the effort and more than just a little unsteady. It got me fit for hiking certainly.

Now I figure if I'm not going to to go backwards in recovery I've got to basically do n it so I'm not really getting much benefit. More n so I'm moving and not getting worse in terms of fitness. Then build up slowly over a few weeks. Stepping back if there's pain issues even taking a break. I'll leave it on damper 3 and DF of 100 for some time.
You still sound like you want to go balls out. I sincerely wish you all the best. You'll find out in your 50's-60's whether you were wise in your decisions. My 67 year old body tells me that I was not.
Eric, YOB:1954
Shasta County, CA, small town USA

JoeChaos
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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by JoeChaos » April 26th, 2021, 2:41 am

Dangerscouse wrote:
April 25th, 2021, 12:35 pm
hjs wrote:
April 25th, 2021, 5:12 am
This can’t wirk, once fit you have to be very smart to get better, look at an olympic athlete, they often improve maybe 1% over a full 4 year cycle and not seldom improve not at all. Trying to beat every training every time will always end in a disaster.
Yep, totally agree. You have got to really clever and considered with how you go about trying to improve, otherwise you're just chasing ever decreasing results and make yourself more susceptible to injury and illness.
Oh I know that doesn't work long term but it was part of new gym routine. Typical gym offered "reprograms " every so often. My gym had a few without knowledge or care who just issued similar routines to everyone. A staff turnaround brought in fresh blood at a time I was sick of no returns. I got a new trainer to give me a he routine and it was totally new. She listened to objectives and I got a whole new set of exercises.

I was mostly doing resistance machines and bike. Bike did nothing much for me so the new routine tried rower then stepper. The plan was to build up the floors. I started doing that but tbh switched to the full target number. The beating first half time was to give motivation. I had been going to the gym but due to ignorance I followed the old staff's tired and unfocused routine. A year and half of dead time.

The new trainer needed a few days to research better plan. That was new. She came back with more dynamic exercises using weights with body weight and avoided resistance machines. She also moved me from the bike to more efficient exercise machines. Rower didn't work, my stride length makes the treadmill a bit dodgy for me so the stepper was used. She also introduced me to the freedom trainer. A nice piece of kit with arms which the weight pulleys operate from. These can be moved in two axis and had two clips for the hand grips depending which direction you're pulling. Designed for disabled use but with a gym ball you could work the whole upper body and especially the core. All while simulating sports like kayaking in my case. Both arms operating opposite like in a paddle. One side then switch.

Anyway the stepper thing was my attempt at seeing fast improvement. It worked then I switched to other things when I got to the inevitable plateau. Mostly interval. The initial stage was about mostly cv work. I later balanced it out.

Now I'm taking it easy. I did other things after that initial 5 minutes row so I've not used it since. No balls out going on here. That's the old and younger me. I'm in recovery for my arm first then recovery for my old fitness. Like the garage gym I'm intending to build is a long term set of goals. Once the arm is right and I'm no longer getting twinges when I do some wrong movement I'll then steadily up my effort. Probably using WOD from c2 for session routines but definitely listen to the body. Recovery more important for arm but also after exercise.

I'm 48 up so I'm no longer the balls out type of exerciser. Goals change with age and experience. I'm not going to be the best I can (in a competitive way), just healthy and fit as I grow older.

Dangerscouse
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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by Dangerscouse » April 26th, 2021, 3:59 am

JoeChaos wrote:
April 26th, 2021, 2:41 am
Dangerscouse wrote:
April 25th, 2021, 12:35 pm
hjs wrote:
April 25th, 2021, 5:12 am
This can’t wirk, once fit you have to be very smart to get better, look at an olympic athlete, they often improve maybe 1% over a full 4 year cycle and not seldom improve not at all. Trying to beat every training every time will always end in a disaster.
Yep, totally agree. You have got to really clever and considered with how you go about trying to improve, otherwise you're just chasing ever decreasing results and make yourself more susceptible to injury and illness.
Oh I know that doesn't work long term but it was part of new gym routine. Typical gym offered "reprograms " every so often. My gym had a few without knowledge or care who just issued similar routines to everyone. A staff turnaround brought in fresh blood at a time I was sick of no returns. I got a new trainer to give me a he routine and it was totally new. She listened to objectives and I got a whole new set of exercises.

I was mostly doing resistance machines and bike. Bike did nothing much for me so the new routine tried rower then stepper. The plan was to build up the floors. I started doing that but tbh switched to the full target number. The beating first half time was to give motivation. I had been going to the gym but due to ignorance I followed the old staff's tired and unfocused routine. A year and half of dead time.

The new trainer needed a few days to research better plan. That was new. She came back with more dynamic exercises using weights with body weight and avoided resistance machines. She also moved me from the bike to more efficient exercise machines. Rower didn't work, my stride length makes the treadmill a bit dodgy for me so the stepper was used. She also introduced me to the freedom trainer. A nice piece of kit with arms which the weight pulleys operate from. These can be moved in two axis and had two clips for the hand grips depending which direction you're pulling. Designed for disabled use but with a gym ball you could work the whole upper body and especially the core. All while simulating sports like kayaking in my case. Both arms operating opposite like in a paddle. One side then switch.

Anyway the stepper thing was my attempt at seeing fast improvement. It worked then I switched to other things when I got to the inevitable plateau. Mostly interval. The initial stage was about mostly cv work. I later balanced it out.

Now I'm taking it easy. I did other things after that initial 5 minutes row so I've not used it since. No balls out going on here. That's the old and younger me. I'm in recovery for my arm first then recovery for my old fitness. Like the garage gym I'm intending to build is a long term set of goals. Once the arm is right and I'm no longer getting twinges when I do some wrong movement I'll then steadily up my effort. Probably using WOD from c2 for session routines but definitely listen to the body. Recovery more important for arm but also after exercise.

I'm 48 up so I'm no longer the balls out type of exerciser. Goals change with age and experience. I'm not going to be the best I can (in a competitive way), just healthy and fit as I grow older.
Good to hear this 👌. Best of luck with it all
47 HWT; 6' 4"; 1k= 3:09; 2k= 6:36; 5k= 17:24; 6k= 20:47; 10k= 35:46 30mins= 8,428m 60mins= 16,618m HM= 1:16.47; FM= 2:40:41; 50k= 3:16:09; 100k= 7:52:44; 12hrs = 153km

"You reap what you row"

Instagram: stuwenman

Adekt
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Re: Recovery from broken arm and rowing?

Post by Adekt » May 1st, 2021, 10:20 pm

Broke my arm 4 years ago and it’s still not right, probably never will be. Things like suspension straps and certain weightlifting movements are nearly impossible but other exercises like jump roping and rowing don’t bother it. Give it time to heal. I used a hammer for my wrist recovery. Brace your arm on your leg then with very controlled wrist movement let the hammer fall. Catch it with the other hand since letting the hammer head drop uncontrollably will probably hurt.

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